Buying a Renovated Queenslander. Risky or Riskless?

Seeing a renovated Queenslander stand proud in the street is a sight many people love and strive to have for themselves. But is it best to buy a renovated Queenslander or buy an old Queenslander and oversee the renovations yourself?

What to consider when looking to buy old Queenslanders with renovations

There’s no doubt about it, a Queenslander looks stunning when renovated. But beauty doesn’t mean they’re not hiding potential headaches and inconsistencies. Here are some tips to help you make your decision.

Maintenance

It’s a known fact that when you buy an old Queenslander, you’re committing yourself to lots of regular maintenance. Depending on what was renovated, be prepared to factor in painting, roof and guttering, wiring, plumbing and more into your budget.

Structural defects

When you look into buying a Queenslander house, it’s easy to get swept up in its beauty, all the while missing the ugly bits. These hidden defects can include cracked stumps, rotten stumps and stumps that have been overcome by concrete cancer. Defects are a red light that indicates a professional is needed.

Termites

Queenslander homes give termites easy access to their favourite food – timber. Ensure the renovation doesn’t cover up any damaged areas or that there’s nothing that can attract termites.

Old-Queenslander-1

Low ceilings

It’s very popular with old Queenslanders to dig down underneath the house to build underneath. Unfortunately, some people bypass this step and build underneath where the ceilings are too low and not up to code. When ceilings are lower than the minimum 2.4-meters, rooms are not habitable. If a renovated Queenslander has two bedrooms that are below height, you can’t advertise these as bedrooms if you decide to sell.

Poor quality

Whether you’re looking to buy a Queenslander or an older renovated home, the same philosophy applies; you can’t judge a book by its cover. Sure, the house looks fantastic but what about the quality of the renovation work and the things you can’t see? That’s why, in the home of the Queenslander, Brisbane building and pest inspections are essential.

Character Profile

Many Queenslanders are in areas classified as character housing zones. Character zones mean any alterations to a Queenslander can affect the value and resale of the property. Examples of out of character renovations are carports, decks with roofs that don’t complement the original roof and enclosing a veranda. 

If you’re in the market to buy a renovated Queenslander, remember that you can’t be too complacent, no matter how good it looks. No house is going to be free of risk. But, you can reduce risk by taking the time to look at everything and give Safeguard Inspections a call to do a pre-purchase inspection.

 

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